ProsocialLearn community

Introducing the ProsocialLearn community

The ProsocialLearn community, a key part of the ProsocialLearn project, aims to involve schools and stakeholders across Europe, centered on innovative teachers eager to adopt prosociality in daily school practice.

By joining the ProsocialLearn community, teachers can play ProsocialLearn games, access educational materials related to prosociality (i.e. learning plans, hands-on activities, articles and online resources) and share best practices, questions, thoughts, ideas and inspiration with colleagues from all around Europe, as well as propose topics for discussion and get advice on how to design activities that promote skills like friendship, feelings, cooperation, fairness, generosity and trust.

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Path of Trust: Christmas Edition

Update: Path of Trust prosocial game

ProsocialLearn’s Path of Trust prototype game for building trustworthiness and teamwork has introduced a new “Christmas” look – asking players whether their partner is in fact “naughty or nice” – and single-player mode.

Path of Trust: Christmas Edition was also presented to third grade pupils of an elementary school in Thessaloniki, Greece on 21 December, receiving very encouraging and supportive feedback.

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No One Left Behind

Gamification: No One Left Behind project

The “No One Left Behind” project, co-funded by the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (Horizon 2020), will guide school children in developing educational games themselves, with the aim of linking gaming to the wider curriculum.

The project is driven by the challenge of many pupils leaving school with no meaningful job skills, at risk of exclusion and not reaching their full potential.

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Pilot study at Greek primary school

Research: Pilot study at Greek primary school

The prosocial game Path of Trust was successfully presented to pupils of Ellinogermaniki Agogi on 16 November 2015. Almost 20 third grade primary school children had the chance to play the game, express their trust and collaborative skills towards their classmates – a first-hand experience of prosocial behaviour.

At the beginning of the activity, the rationale of Path of Trust was explained and how the game was played. The time that the rest of classroom waited for their turn to play was devoted to prosocial classroom activities, aimed at familiarising pupils with prosocial behaviour and setting-up a pedagogical framework for the games to follow.

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